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What Is the Most Effective Way to Quit Smoking?

The most effective way to quit smoking

While there are a number of ways to quit smoking, not all of them are equally successful. Here we will break down What Is the Most Effective Way to Quit Smoking that has been used with the most success by those who quit. Keep in mind that success rates will not be the same for everyone. In the end, quitting comes down to a personal decision, the amount of willpower you have and a variety of factors affecting your daily life. But if you want the best chance of success, then these are the methods you should be trying.

Nicotine Replacement

More people successfully quit smoking when they use some sort of nicotine therapy than by almost any other measure. This could involve applying a nicotine patch, using nicotine lozenges, or any other form of nicotine therapy.

What this does is, hopefully, reduce the amount of nicotine going into your body. Gradually, you decrease the amounts you are taking each day and finally get rid of the nicotine and nicotine replacement entirely. This weans your body off of smoking slowly without having to just cut back on cigarettes over time. You will still feel the effects of nicotine on your body, but you won’t be suffering from all the negative effects of smoking a cigarette. It’s not the safest way to quit smoking, but it works the best for the largest number of people.

Trigger Avoidance

For everyone who smokes, there are certain triggers that cause you to crave cigarettes more than you would in most situations. For some people, that trigger is a stressful situation. For others, they simply have a set time and place where they smoke, perhaps when they are on break from work or when they are talking on the phone.

As you quit smoking, these triggers will become even more powerful at creating cravings. If you want to stop yourself form giving in to the cravings, you need to ensure that the triggers never activate. So that means actively avoiding situations that make you feel like you need a cigarette. And if you are used to having a cigarette during something you do every day, then occupy yourself otherwise during those times.

If you would normally smoke while on the phone, then keep a pen and paper handy to just doodle and scribble while you talk. If you would smoke on your lunch break, then do something to keep yourself engaged and distracted from smoking during that time.

Cold Turkey

It may be hard to believe, but the majority of people who have successfully quit smoking have done so by quitting cold turkey. They decided that they would never take another cigarette and they followed through on that promise to themselves.

Now it may seem odd that more people could quit this way than any other, especially since most experts advise that you never try to quit cold turkey. But these statistics come straight from the American Cancer Society. More than 80% of those who have successfully quit smoking did so by the cold turkey method. Now you can’t just decide to stop smoking and have no plan beyond that and expect to be successful. Many of those who have quit cold turkey did so with a lot of support from other people.

The surrounded themselves with people who cared about them and their success and they made a detailed plan about how they were going to go about quitting. This involves lot of willpower, constant reminders why they were quitting and people who were looking out for their wellbeing.

Slowly but Surelyquit-smoking-slowly

You could also try to quit by just cutting back on your cigarette use until you no longer need a cigarette anymore. This is ideal for heavy smokers who are really deep into their habit. You can just slowly cut back how much you smoke from day to day and week to week.

You take yourself form a pack a day to a pack a week and then a cigarette every other day. This gradually depletes the amount of nicotine in your body and makes the cravings easier to resist, but it may not work for everyone.

And that is the story with each of these methods. They are going to work well for some people, but not for everyone. You may know someone who quit cold turkey, but that doesn’t mean you will be able to do it. Quitting is something personal, and each individual has to find their own best way to do so.

95 Responses to "What Is the Most Effective Way to Quit Smoking?"

  • Nick
    December 4, 2015 - 2:02 am Reply

    A major reason it’s difficult to break a bad habit is because your brain believes the habit is pleasurable even if you aren’t happy with it. I’m currently working with a company called Pavlok that demotes any bad habit you may possess. It uses beeps, vibrations, and shocks to create negative associations with the bad habit you are trying to eliminate. If you’re actually ready to quit, this is might just be the best way to do it.

    • Elaine Strickland
      April 7, 2016 - 10:26 am Reply

      So, I a twp pack a day smoker could really quit using this system? How do I start?

    • HJS
      June 9, 2016 - 12:56 am Reply

      Hello, do u guys operate in dubai uae? Or is there a way for u to help someone here?

    • Cnnie
      June 24, 2016 - 11:22 pm Reply

      How u doing so far

    • Chiara
      June 29, 2016 - 11:40 pm Reply

      Behavior Modification….it works for most people but you have to be committed to work at it.

  • Jan Brown
    March 11, 2016 - 5:55 pm Reply

    The best way is Acupressure. I had success as well as several people I know. AND it has no side effects!

    • Susan Kennedy
      April 6, 2016 - 1:37 am Reply

      Where can I find this type of treatment in Indiana?

  • Dean Harris
    March 15, 2016 - 7:20 am Reply

    Thanks for Sharing…Nice Blog

    • Janie Horne
      June 26, 2016 - 9:00 pm Reply

      Dean I went cold turkey 72hrs ago are you my long lost friend? Herman

  • Colm
    March 26, 2016 - 6:23 am Reply

    Allen cars easy way seems to have it all .and with a battle against cravings still has to be won .theres almost a pleasure in fighting the fight .well working for me .one week in

    • Gary wood
      April 17, 2016 - 5:43 pm Reply

      Ihave been on an allen car seminar and it really is good,the main criterior is to be a happy none smoker which i found difficult to imagine.If you can get your head around this it must be a sucess, good luck for the future.

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 7:20 pm Reply

      “…Pleasure in fighting the fight… ”
      I feel so Ding-dang empowered by that statement!
      And there SHOULD be Pleasure in Battle with evil. Cigarettes sold these days are the epitome of evil.
      This. Is. WAR.
      And with the new paradigm you’ve provided, I expect to win every battle!
      (Soon’s I smoke these last four packs8-D)

    • Dee
      July 10, 2016 - 7:50 pm Reply

      How’s it going? Allan’s book is great!

  • Marsha
    March 31, 2016 - 3:52 am Reply

    I smoked my last cigarette 49 hours ago. I spent my last week of smoking arguing with my cigarettes until we,broke up Monday night. I said you stink, you stole from me days and dollars, time and my taste and smell. I am over this relationship I savored my last smoke,like a,long kiss then I threw it in the,garbage and,went to bed. I woke up 8 hours later , 8 hours smoke free and proceeded with my day. Oh you tried to distract me but I broke out a word search. Next time. I took a,walk. You can’t cone back. We,are over. You are an aas hole cigarettes I’m done with this pseudo long term dysfunctional relationship. You are,a liar a,cheat a,thief and a,fool.

    • m
      April 5, 2016 - 5:04 am Reply

      This is honestly the best reply I have seen in very long time. How has your journey been going so far? Successful? Tough? Going through withdrawals? Did you relapse at all? Its all about trial and error. I can tell you have a positive attitude towards this and conquering this addiction. You will get it, I know you can do it.

    • cathi
      April 5, 2016 - 7:38 pm Reply

      This is what I’m going with. Tba I you for sharing!

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 7:23 pm Reply

      LOVE IT, Marsha. Kick his A$$ to the curb!

    • Rockl
      June 18, 2016 - 11:22 pm Reply

      That is really an amazing response! I do hope you were able to quit… And didn’t go back to that very abusive relationship that really wastes time and money!

    • Billie
      June 24, 2016 - 11:39 am Reply

      That’s awesome! This too is to be my approach. I am going out of town this weekend without the means to break down and buy anymore of these little bastards. I have been trying for nearly a year and always give up on myself no more they will not beat me

    • Dee
      July 21, 2016 - 11:57 pm Reply

      That’s a great way to look at quitting cigarettes like quitting a bad relationship. 🙂

    • Deborah
      August 23, 2016 - 3:12 am Reply

      Marsha, it’s now Late August. I pray you’re still kicking that cigarette ‘s ass. Enjoyed your post. I don’t smoke but my husband has his whole life and today he gave up the cigarettes. He is having a most difficult time. He is battling COPD. I pray he can fight this.

    • Jennifer hupp
      August 28, 2016 - 5:42 pm Reply

      I love this! Very clever!

  • Qaisar
    March 31, 2016 - 4:21 am Reply

    I have decided to quit and I will do so cold turkey. See how long I can hold…..my motivation is $$$ saving because in Ontario, Canada my brand is almost $13.00 and I am buying 5-6 packs a week.

  • Sharon Karawan
    April 1, 2016 - 8:04 am Reply

    Please pray for me Dear God I’m sick of smoking. As soon as I open my eyes I grab one, and I don’t even like smoking anymore!! I haven’t started my journey yet but I have the greatest help of all GOD. The more prayers the. Better. Thank you all.

  • Fahad
    April 2, 2016 - 12:09 pm Reply

    The best way is quitting cold turkey. Just make sure that for at least 2 weeks there are no stressors or triggers that would want you to smoke. I kept a whole pack of cigarettes with me all the time which kind of psychologically helped, it kind of stopped the yearning to smoke when I saw someone smoke, because I had cigarettes with me all the time (you yearn more for something you don’t have)

    After about 2 weeks, your dependence on nicotine and cigarettes is almost gone and after sometime you will be irritated by cigarette smoke and it gets very easy from there on.

  • Joel.J
    April 4, 2016 - 1:21 am Reply

    I stopped January 11,2016.I used the patch,almost 3 weeks totally nicotine free.But i also made up my mind about this addiction.Time to put it to rest.Feeling verry good and getting my wind totally back 🙂

  • Christina McDonald
    April 7, 2016 - 3:42 am Reply

    I stopped today and I feel like I wanna hit something my bf says im being a major bitch but I already know if I don’t quit now I never will I’ve been smoking since I was 18 (im 30 now) any advice for me I could really use some help before I rip someone’s head off

    • Bradley Bland
      April 17, 2016 - 2:59 pm Reply

      Don’t pick up another one! Or in 15 years you’ll be saying you started when you were 18, and now your 45. That’s kinda where I am at. Except back then, I wasn’t feeling run down when I woke up, tired during the middle of the day, winded after two flights of stairs. NO motivation to play with my kids outside. Just to name a few. I think the road to recovery must be harder as you get older, but after trying many many methods (Everything except acupuncture… Which is next), I believe it becomes more difficult to rebound to what you believe you used to be. I know I can be cold, but hard truths are not easy, and sugar coating something like this not fair to anyone trying to quit.

      • Ruffer
        June 6, 2016 - 7:32 pm Reply

        Bradley Brand;
        And, thx.

    • Eric
      June 18, 2016 - 4:18 am Reply

      On top of ditching those cigarettes ditch the boyfriend. A good bf would support you not call you a bitch. Sounds like a D bag to me. But good on you for quiting.

      I just had a baby girl and always told myself i would quit if i had a kid. Well no excuses now. My wife hates it too.

  • Wade Gannaway
    April 7, 2016 - 1:31 pm Reply

    I am preparing myself mentally to quit smoking. I’ve tried twice before “cold turkey” which was a disaster. I could not control my agitation at all. My wife bought me a pack. She was tired of dealing with me. Second time I used the patch. Had success but blew it 6 months later simply due to lack of self control. That was in my 30’s now I am 50 and want my quality of life back.

  • jan
    April 7, 2016 - 7:49 pm Reply

    how long does it take to smell better.. This is my first day. So far so good.

  • tasha
    April 8, 2016 - 3:54 am Reply

    I have been smoking for 15 years was on a pack a day habit for the past three years. Recently i started vaping and it has been awesome! Currently im vaping 6mg nicotine but because vaping is strong i puff less. I love it. Ive been smoke free for three weeks and havent had the urge for a cig. Once my friend came to visit and smoked a cig i took a drag from it and i was so turned off of tasted terriable unlike my fruity vape that tastes like juicy fruit. Im so happy my husband bought me my vape mod we are both happy..he tells me i smell so much better. Ive notice my teeth are whiter and my car is cleaner and smells great! Three weeks in and i pray for many more

  • Bruce
    April 15, 2016 - 9:39 am Reply

    Quitting has never been a problem….staying quit is the problem.I can quit for a month or a year and then one day just start up…..I have been smoke free for a while now but i’m always worried I will just start up again.

    • Gary wood
      April 17, 2016 - 5:34 pm Reply

      hi bruce i also have no problem stopping, but i forget how much i want to stop in the first place and undo the great work. this time iam going to post on here and that will help me remember what i want to achieve.

  • Sandra Smith
    April 17, 2016 - 5:51 am Reply

    I need to stop 🚬 i want to live so i can see my Grandchildren grow up

    • Sandra Smith
      April 17, 2016 - 5:57 am Reply

      I went3 days with out smokeing but hade to have one🚬

      • Ruffer
        June 6, 2016 - 7:36 pm Reply

        I don’t believe there’s there is a ‘One’.
        Is there?

    • Sue
      August 29, 2016 - 2:37 am Reply

      Me too. I am 65 and just found out I have copd. My dr. Said it was beginning and if i stop now it could reverse. I am having a awful time guiting.

    April 17, 2016 - 12:02 pm Reply


    I’m almost stop smoking from yesterday and today i really wont too smoke case my mouth is starching even i can not concentrate on work as well. i tried chew gum as well but till the time i’m controlling my mind, but please suggest me more tips case this is really really hard to avoid smoke.

    for your information, i use to smoke 1 packet in a day, so should i cut down 1st or suddenly quite smoking is a good idea and it will help me to quite.

    please help on this.


    • shivam
      April 20, 2016 - 4:35 pm Reply

      reducing has not worked for me. You are either a smoker or non smoker…
      Dont let your hard work go in drain by taking even a puff..
      First 3 days are really hard but 4th morning onwards you would wake much fresher and that feeling is awesome. However, do make sure that your hard work of 3 days, the most itchy, does pay off by not giving in to even a puff of smoke. Stay away from smoking zones.. Pity the smokers as people who can’t control their minds and its cravings.
      Believe me 4th morning onwards you would feel a new rejuvenated you.. Much fresher from inside, much more energetic and youthful you..

      • Nomi
        June 12, 2016 - 5:34 am Reply

        Utter bullocks. Maybe for some.
        Day five of being clean, total nicotine detox, but the abdominal pain, total inability to focus or think, muscle cramps/tension, stabbing heaches, indigestion, anxiety, mood swings and increasing agitation (and worsening insomnia) finally got to me.
        I caved and accepted a smoke from a friend. That was 6 hours ago. I feel remarkably better. Calmer. Especially considering that all of that is on top of the chronic pain that I ALREADY live with daily, including chronic migraines. Which got worse and compounded with icepick headaches.
        It seems to me that “Cold Turkey” may not be for everyone and it IS a major shock to one’s system, which could trigger problems. Causing my chronic illnesses to flare up, for instance.
        I’m considering trying vaping again. I HAVE to quit, but nothing has worked long term for me.

  • Gary wood
    April 17, 2016 - 4:30 pm Reply

    My name is gary ,in 2012 i quit smoking for three years ,i used the patch for three months, and then joined the smoking timeline forum which was a massive help.As time went by i was able to give assistance to many people on that site and they all helped me.During that time i felt that i had beat the nicotine monster,sadly the forum seemed to close overnight, even so i carried on with the quit untill one alcahol fuelled night when i thougt one cigarete wont hurt i stupidly started to smoke again, that was fourteen months ago.On the 11 of april 2016 i put the patch on again and here i am on a new forum looking for help and guidance to help my addiction.Ido hope that i get some replys to my post, i inturn will reply to your questiones.As you can imagine i have good knowledge on the subject and will try to help you all. my age is 55 and i want to quit for good.

    • Brandi
      April 20, 2016 - 1:21 am Reply

      I’m 38 years old and I’ve smoked since I was 16. I am currently having trouble breathing and sleeping. I can’t climb the stairs without being winded. I’ve had pneumonia twice this winter and I just can’t get back to good this time and I know it’s because of the damage I’ve done to my lungs. I need to quit, I’m trying to find the best way to. I have 3 babies (7,5,3) and I want to see them grow up. I’m so depressed thinking about what could happen and yet here I sit ready to smoke another one.
      I hope your doing well on your new journey with the patch, I’m considering going that route myself. I was thinking chantix but the side effects seem pretty harsh.

      • moose
        April 22, 2016 - 1:43 am Reply

        This is the first time I’ve ever tried something like this! I’ve tried to quit many many times but always fall off the wagon. Im replying to your post because I too feel the same way. I have 3 beautiful little girls. I’ve been smoking for more than half my life and I’m 33 now. I have chest pains all the time and can hardly breathe. I try reminding myself when I smoke that it is killing me but yet I still continue. I hope you can quit and wish you the best of luck.

      • Sarah
        June 9, 2016 - 4:51 am Reply

        Brandi, I am 38 as well and started smoking at the young age of 12. Most of my childhood and adult memories are of me smoking. I decided to quit using the nicotine patches and gum so far it has been very easy for me. I have tried quitting several times several different ways and find this to be the best way for me. The gum helps with the cravings that pop up here and there also when I have a craving I take a deep breath and hold it for 5 seconds and while I hold my breath I tell myself encouraging words. I was a pack a day smoker (sometimes more) and had the same breathing and sleeping problems you did along with anxiety, irritability, fear, low self esteem etc. I put my patch on one night and woke up the next morning and chewed the gum all day and every fear and negative thought I got worked up over never happened. Within hours I felt better, had more energy, I just all around felt great compared to the shitty feeling cigarettes made me believe was a great feeling. Brandi, just put a patch on and chew the gum to see how it works. It’s not going to hurt you. Good luck on your new journey

      • Trish
        August 27, 2016 - 8:22 am Reply

        Oh brandi I feel your anxiety. I’m 56 and have been smoking since I was 14. I gave up a few years ago for one year but started again…sneaking the odd puff here and there and the next thing I’m full on smoking again. So I’m now 10 days in simply because I got a chest infection and couldn’t be bothered getting dressed to go and buy some more when I ran out as I was so ill. I’d also found a lump in my breast and obviously became terrified and blamed it on smoking. Thank God it’s not cancer but it was enough to spur me into giving up and not leaving my children without their mother. I read something that Chrissy Hind said when she was full on into her addictions “if you want to break a habit, stop doing it.” So I’ve stopped with the aid of an e cigarette. Bloody brilliant invention and way better than the disgusting gum and the patches which give you heinous nightmares. Good luck – you’ve probably already given up by now but remember it’s a head game

    • stanley
      April 22, 2016 - 2:58 pm Reply

      Hi Gary, I did the same thing.. Quit for 4 years, had few few drinks with “friends”, now i’m back to a pack a day!! Last 6 days, I have cut down, like been only smoking 2 to 4 a day.. That doesnt seem to work for me, it’s all or nothing.. Sooo, I got my supply of patches (again) and set my quit date for May 2nd. Have you set a date yet, or still in contemplation mode? Feel free to email me for chat 🙂

    • Tam
      April 25, 2016 - 8:40 am Reply

      im with you! new to smoking but i smoke a lot. its like why did i start this habit? its harmful to ur health, then i thk of the pleasure i derive from it. therein lies the issue i need to defeat in order to quit for good. i understand body has picked up a dependency, my mind has to overcome! thinking now as i write that the pleasure i think im getting is false…

      • Cole
        May 20, 2016 - 4:05 am Reply

        You won’t always get pleasure from it. I’ve smoked for 15 years and I hate it now. The pleasure you get early on eventually turns to disgust. I am in the very early stages of my quit but if there’s one thing I can tell you is that eventually you’ll hate the habit as bad as you need it.

    • Mike Newsom
      May 17, 2016 - 5:03 pm Reply

      Gary, my name is Mike. I started smoking around the age of 15. I am now 58. I quit smoking in 2011 for 10 months. Suddenly one stressful day I picked up a cigarette and have had trouble quitting ever since. I also drink beer and find that the 2 habits kind of go hand and hand. I want to kick this habit. I feel that I will have to give up drinking as well. I am going to attempt quitting again soon. I am now up to 2 packs a day and the price of cigarettes just continue to rise. I am wanting to retire in about 5 years, and I really don’t want to be dependent on cigarettes. I am planning on setting a date to stop smoking. I feel that I have to get my mind focused on this and be determined that I will not give in to the craving. I wish you success in your attempt to kick this very bad habit.

    • Sisco
      May 23, 2016 - 8:32 pm Reply

      How are you doing with the cigarettes? I’m 54 and have smoked for 35 years. I’m on day 2 of quitting

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 7:43 pm Reply

      Gary! Please, YOU START A SMOKING FORUM.
      If you’re not comp savvy (I’m not) start one using a facebook page. You are the pro, right? Then post a link here so we can all find you.
      I’ve been reading all these posts hoping to hear from someone who’s DONE it, I think you’re it!
      Do consider.
      And, thx.

  • Missy
    April 19, 2016 - 6:18 pm Reply

    I am currently smoking 6 a day. When I started my journey I was a pack and half a day smoker. On May 1st I Will be smoke free. Here’s a tip that I like to use. Say the alphabet and as you say each letter say a word that begins with that letter. It helps get thru cravings and I rarely make it very far in the alphabet!

  • KD
    April 21, 2016 - 12:28 am Reply

    Ok day 1. Pray for me.

    • Sisco
      May 23, 2016 - 8:48 pm Reply

      Hey KD, I’m on day 2. How are you making it?

  • Amanda
    April 21, 2016 - 7:04 pm Reply

    I have been smoke free for 9 days and the first 3 were a piece of cake….since then I am a damn mess. Every day I want to smoke more, I have been smoking for 22 years someone please tell me this gets easier soon…I really don’t want to smoke again, but I really don’t want to keep crying for no apparent reason or bitching about nothing that’s important… my teenage boys are going hate me and my husband is going to think I’m nuts before this is over

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 8:05 pm Reply

      Amanda, remember THIS: the Crazies do pass!
      Missy’s suggestion about the alphabet sounds great, try it and anything else you can, but DON’T PICK UP.
      Tools: Drink grapefruit juice.
      Suck on vitamin C lozenges.
      Brush your teeth when you’re craving-crazy, and use only cinnamon toothpaste and mouthwash.
      Talk to your God, ask him to sit with you awhile, or walk with you.
      Trust me, your son’s and hubby will honor you, especially when you’re a non-smoker and the know what you had to go through to be that. As opposed to putting them through the Crazies for Nada.
      Still, remember also: This Is For You. Dwelling on the expectations of others creates stressors you don’t need.
      And even if you ‘slip and fall’ get your butt back up and do it!
      Good Luck!

  • Gary wood
    April 28, 2016 - 1:22 pm Reply

    not smoked since 11 /4i am ok at the moment,the patches are going ok,it seems to be the triggers that worry me such as going out for a drink and wanting to smoke.Having been through this before i know that this is an illusion and that we all can controll the problem.Iwould like to say to stanley that cutting down is no good because it makes the cig seem to be the be all and end all.you have been here before,and know what is possible.Moose things get better quickly you will soon be able to run upstairs you have the best reason of all to stop. What we all seem to want to know is how long does it take to be cured,the answer is to be happy to not be smoking and pitty those that do.Areal good idea is to save the money you spend on the evil weed,over here in england my prefered brand now costs 10 pound per pack, so it soon adds up.I really do think we are on a good site here and as time goes by we can beat this monster,lets just keep asking questiones and collectivley we will provide the answers. cheers Gary

  • Barbara
    April 29, 2016 - 10:03 am Reply

    I’m 47 and have been smoking since i was a teenager. i would have classified myself as a social smoker because I have gone a couple years (while I was pregnant, and I have seven children) without touching one but the last seven years I’m smoking a pack or more a day. I quit for 5 weeks this past September but there was no much stressful things going on in my life and some family members still smoked so one day i bummed one from my son and that started the habit all over again. So I REALLY want to quit and get healthy. i guess I’m going cold turkey.

  • Carmen
    April 29, 2016 - 5:04 pm Reply

    I am coming up on 4 years smoke free. I quite cold turkey. Just stopped smoking. Bubblemint gum helped me the most. But also knowing that having one single drag resets everything and puts you back at square one. I haven’t had a single drag since October 2012. Not one.
    What you have to do is just mentally prepare yourself. You are killing an addiction. The addiction isn’t going to like it, and it’s going to be mad, and it’s going to trick you and rear it’s ugly head. It’s going to make you feel like crap, and guilty that you are quitting, and bitchy so people around you will suffer and eventually give in to this addiction. Over time, it’ll fade away but you’ll never be rid of it. You’re going to go through your “firsts”. The first time you wake up and not have your morning smoke. Or the first time you go to the bar/pub with your friends and want a smoke. Day by day, it gets easier.
    Personally I think NRT (nicotine reduction therapy) is such a waste of money. Use your brain. Use yourself. Use the willpower! It’s free!
    Best of luck to all you “quitters” out there. I’ve quit, and I’ve never looked back.

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 8:19 pm Reply

      Carmen, I think you are correct about nicotine replacement therapy. Nicotine is the substance that causes addiction, it’s the Tar in cigarettes that kill you.
      Does anyone recall the Congressional hearings on cigarette manufacturers manipulating nicotine levels (to insure addiction, what else)?
      Not only that, now there making money off all the NRT’s! And don’t let me get started on vapes and how they’re marketed & packaged for the younger demographic!
      Still, “to each his own reach”. I see hear that some have found NRT’s useful.

    • Juliet
      June 8, 2016 - 8:38 pm Reply

      Ur message really inspires thank you

      • Elizabeth Wilson
        July 24, 2016 - 3:30 am Reply

        Carmen is correct. I was going to say lucky because that’s the way I always felt about people I knew or heard about who quit smoking successfully. I felt they were lucky and I felt jealous, resentful and seriously pissed off. I also felt I would never be able to get past one day of quitting after 47 years of smoking. I quit four months ago – two weeks after I was diagnosed with COPD. Major motivator but the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I know you’ve heard that from every jerk who’s ever quit smoking and you think ‘Sure. Wish I could too’. I hope you can. Try it. If you can’t get past the first day don’t stress. Try another time. If you get past the first week and survive the smokers flu you just have to add a day to your list every evening. Soon it’s weeks and then months. At four months, why would I ever want to go back to day one. Do I still miss it? Sure! But I just can’t go back. Try it. If it doesn’t work, no harm done. If it does. Good for you!

  • Gary wood
    April 30, 2016 - 4:29 pm Reply

    Congratulation carmen on your four year quit,it sounds like you have had a bad time,i disagree with your oppinio of nrt being a waste of money,it is a lot cheaper than cigs and any product that helps can only be good.One of the problems of the willpower method is that you will never actually know when you have quit for good,and hence your oppinion that it never leaves you.It might help if you adopt the allen car method where you be a happy nonesmoker.I think we all should heed his advice so that four years down the line we are still not thinking about the weed.

  • Gary wood
    May 1, 2016 - 11:00 am Reply

    Hi stanley hope you are looking forward to your quit date, what method are you using/ keep us all informed of your progress, good luck you can do this.Iwoke up this morning thinking about a trip to wales next week and the nicotine monster reared its ugly head,the association of a good time and a smoke is very strong in me and is allways my downfall.Within ten minutes of complaining about how i canot live without a smoke to my wife the thought left me.Her comment to my not living without a smoke was that is what nicotine is doing to you.Nicotine is a tricky devil.Reguarding to the nicotine patch,i now realise it is very important to have the new patch next to the bed so i can replace the old one straight away.Ihave decided that after one more week iam going to reduce the patch levell t0 14mg,i will take 14 mg for three weeks before introducing the allen car easy way into my life,i do not know if anyone has tried this method before but it seems to make some .sense. 560 cigaretes not smoked,280 pounds saved,most important i seem to be able to breath,all the best gary

  • Erin
    May 18, 2016 - 3:57 am Reply

    I am 28 been smoking since was 16… I am wanting to quitI, I want to try the acupuncture!! Have heard alot of good things about that!! But heres the point and I know it has to be the person and have to have the WANT TO QUIT MENTALITY BUT I also want my dad to quit with me… He is 58 and smoked since he was very young.. Im pretty sure he has or is on the verge of getting COPD… I am a daddy’s girl, he is a deputy sheriff and I can’t even start to imagine that day when he is no longer here.. he is my daddy…😔 I have twin girls (3yrs old) who I want to be able to have a better and longer relationship with him!!! I messaged him “If you could quit would you? Would you want to quit with me? We could quit together!!” His response “That would be great” I said “Do you want to quit?” No response back yet? 😔

  • Diane
    May 18, 2016 - 11:16 pm Reply

    Hi. I’m 46 and have smoked for 30 yrs. I cut down to 8 a day then bought the patch. I’ve been wearing it for a few weeks now, but still need that 1 or 2 cigs. I wait until I’m awake for a couple hours and never smoke after 330 pm. So weird those 2. Just can’t do it. So, tomorrow I’m gonna buy lozenges too and combine them both and see how it goes. I do have smokes, but I want what I can’t have, so maybe if I have, then I won’t want, and I’ll have a lozenge instead. I did quit before on Zyban for 11 mths, but I caved and that was years ago. I tell myself, I’m only a quitter if I stop trying to quit. Wish me luck……again!!

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 8:25 pm Reply

      Try vitamin C lozenges instead…

  • JoieC
    May 18, 2016 - 11:46 pm Reply

    So I have a hard time trying to even commit to quitting. I want to and I need to, but I just can’t commit to it. I have tried before, but was suck a horrible bit*h that my sister told me that I need to go back to smoking or she would kill me. I am so tired of spending the money on something that I do not even enjoy anymore. Comments and suggestions are welcom

  • Nikki
    May 22, 2016 - 5:44 am Reply

    I too did the cold turkey. Three times. Now I’m ready to so again. It’s like I smoke than I eat. And I’ve lost allot of weight so what I do to gain my weight back , when I crave a cigarette I eat and snack until the cracking is gone so when I finish eating what follows,? A cigarette right? So that means I’m eating more and gaining my weight back. But I haven’t started my cold turkey yet. I want to start Sunday or @12 am. I smoke a pack a day and they are Newport’s long. I’m soooooooo ready to stop. I caint fit none of my clothes and I’m not buying new clothes because I don’t plan on being a size 1 for to long. From a7/8 to a size 1 in under a yr. Yes Lord is time to put those cigs rest. Y’all pray for me. I will pay for your struggling to stop smoking cold turkey.

  • Tony
    May 23, 2016 - 10:19 pm Reply

    I have never smoked but my wife of nine years has smoked most of her adult life (except when she was pregnant). She and her mother are attempting to quit smoking by smoking one less cigarette a day until they are down to zero. I hope they can do this because my mother-in-law has chronic bronchitis (COPD) and is coughing about 1,000 times a day. I am fearful she will not be around much longer even if she quits. Any advice on how I, as a non-smoking husband, should be in a supporting role?

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 8:46 pm Reply

      Keep your head down and your patience up.
      My husband quit cold-turkey 30 years ago and never once criticized me for continuing to do so. (His methods were SO bizarre I never share them). When I decided to quit, he would purchase aides for me, but understood that it was a very personal battle. While in reality, no one overcomes an addiction by themselves (like the objects on a child’s moblie, everyone connected is affected) it most certainly FEELS that way.
      There are a gamut, no, a plethora of emotions that one experiences when quitting. I call this the Crazies. If you attempt to involve yourself without being asked, the Crazies can grow, intensify and mutate! I am not joking.
      Learn more about them so that you can be better equipped to duck when you need to and stand when you need to do that.
      I think that the best advice I can give is:
      1. Be prepared.
      2. Be patient.

  • Kenneth S
    May 26, 2016 - 7:43 am Reply

    Im leaving this comment as a reminder for myself, i quit smoking on 04.04.2016 so i have reached 7 weeks and a few days without a cigarette, I smoked since i was 15 (ish) and now i am 6 months away from i am 50. I decided to quit even though i have tried several times before i have never managed more than 21 days before and normally only 3 – 4 days but recently i had bad chest contractions like beginnings of a downhill spiral towards a heartattack or coronary blood clout. I have also stopped drinking completely which was also on high side before and so far again nothing to drink for around same time, and i began going to gym every week 4 times to ensure my lungs get some excecise as well as rest of my body.
    I like wish everyone else with will to stop or has stopped to continue its absolutely worth the fight smoking kills simply said and it costs a bucket load now, i have found it hard on occasion at moment i am suffering from a bad chesty cough part of process of my lungs now trying to clean up my 34 years of this bad habit but i will keep on track and i shall to continue my update.

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 8:54 pm Reply

      Thank you, Kenneth S.
      I believe that you are already a success story because you have made Major Lifestyle Changes!
      Thanks again, we all need to hear that it CAN be done.
      Please do continue to update.
      And, KUDOS!

  • Kristen
    May 31, 2016 - 7:19 pm Reply

    I tried my first cigarette at age 18. It was so gross but I continued to smoke because of peer pressure. I also have asthma so the guilt I feel about smoking is just tremendous. I pray often to stop but it is a social trigger for me. I don’t wake up and smoke. Its usually just on the weekends when I have had a few cocktails. I hate myself for it the next day and throw whatever is left in the pack away. My grandparents have both passed away from cigarette related illnesses, my father has, two of my best friends, and now my mother-in-law is days away from leaving this world because of cigarettes. You would think that seeing all these people that I love in my life die from cigarettes I would wake up and never put one in my mouth again. Fat chance!! Its so horrible for you and I hate yet I still do it every weekend. I really need some help.

    • Ruffer
      June 6, 2016 - 9:23 pm Reply

      Don’t look for addiction to make sense! We all know, and probably knew, we could be harmed by cigarettes. Yet, here we all are.
      Turn your weekend syndrome around by takeing pride in the Fact that you’re a Non-smoker. Because, really, you ARE. My guess is that the weekend thing is about something else entirely.
      Could you be trying to relieve the stressors of social situations?
      Check it by doing something truly relaxing on the weekend instead. See if you crave the little nasties then.
      If not, talk to a therapist for a few months. There may be dual benefits from it, because you’ve seen a lot of death, no matter the cause.
      If you do crave, stop in that moment and analyze it: “why do I want to smoke right now? what was the trigger?”
      Then grab a vitamin C lozenge instead. Or any other thing, just Do Not Pick Up!
      If it’s a true nicotine craving, you may benefit from a low dose patch, say, 2mg.
      I think that’s the lowest. But with the little that you do smoke, I’m certain that you could WIN without them.
      Certainly, you will want to go where any free person goes, and that’s as it should be, but until you get a handle on this (get free of nicotine) maybe you want to do different stuff for a bit.
      Good luck!

  • Ruffer
    June 6, 2016 - 9:34 pm Reply

    Okay, Gary, I now see that there IS a fb page for us.
    Hope to see you there!

  • Richard
    June 6, 2016 - 10:28 pm Reply

    I’m not sure how you can list NRT as an effective way to stop smoking. Isn’t the failure rate about 94% in the medium to long term? I asked the doctors and Nicorette about how they get their stats on success using NRT and they use the 4 week point as a measure of success. FOUR WEEKS! And that is while you are still on the patches too. If your last fag was 4 weeks ago and you are still on patches I don’t consider you to be a successful non-smoker. Sorry.
    6 months after you finished using patches maybe. 12 months…ok , congratulations, you are officially a non smoker. 4 weeks? not a chance!

  • Theresa
    June 6, 2016 - 11:53 pm Reply

    My name is Theresa I’ve been smoking since I was 16 I am no 52 any suggestions on how to quit or some words of encouragement

  • wyatt
    June 8, 2016 - 6:12 am Reply

    Hi everyone, I have been smoking since I was 15, my quit day starts tomorrow. ..I started out smoking thinking it was “cool”…that didn’t last long…it went from being cool to smoking 2 packs a day…the effects are just terrible on my health…i am going to get the patches in the morning and start my journey..I know there will be alot of bumps in the road but it is something I feel I need to do for myself. ..the taste and the smell is just gross yet I keep doing it..not to mention I am slowly killing myself…the words self inflicted death posted on my tombstone ….I’ll let you know how day 1 and 2 go….I also hope everyone is doing well on their journey to becoming smoke free

    • Paul Rufus
      June 13, 2016 - 9:35 am Reply

      I have this view that 75% of the battle is won, when you have decided that, its time. Please do not start counting hrs. Its done and dusted. Buy yours self some strong mint candies and take them liberally. Its not that difficult. Believe me

  • Cindy Bower
    June 10, 2016 - 1:59 pm Reply

    I need to stop smoking. I am 60 years old and have been smoking a long time and have tried
    to quit several times. 11 years ago I was in horrific car accident requiring mechanical ventilation
    after suffering 37 fractures. I should have died but didn’t and am doing amazing well with all
    my fractures. It is really hard to quit cigarettes.

  • Lorraine
    June 13, 2016 - 3:10 am Reply

    Hello i have been smokin since i was 15 years old and i am now 26. I have 4 beautiful kids that by some miracle when i was pregnant i was actually able to stop smoking but then picked it right back up after i had them. With one of my children i didnt know i was pregnant and smoked almost a month during my pregnancy. But i stopped as soon as i found out. She has had really bad asthma a baby and i feel so bad. I am ready stop smoking. The only times i really smoke is when im upset or really bored. Even though im not a big smoker it is still hard to quit. But everything in me says i dont need it but my brain keeps saying its to hard. I need to find something that can keep me busy during those hard times. My last cigarette will be at 1150 pm so i can start fresh tomorrow. I hope this works out cause im tired of them.

  • Tom C.
    June 13, 2016 - 6:21 am Reply

    This is my third time trying to quit and I’m feeling good. tried the patches and gum before, but just got so frustrated that I stopped. Found this Rien Pipe program on Amazon two weeks ago and it’s been working out alright so far. Might just make it this time.

  • Paul Rufus
    June 13, 2016 - 9:27 am Reply

    We all know smoking is bad. We have this disgusting picture on the pack, yet we smoke. Believe me no one can make you stop smoking, but you. Recently I went to Kenya on Safari and on Lake Naivasha I had to walk up to the crater to view the wild life. I just could not do it. I was so breathless ( by the way I am 48 ). I lost precious part of my wild life safari. I started blaming cigarettes and started this resolve of quitting and one fine day ( just after 20days of my safari ) while smoking I decided this is my last packet and loved each one of them and said goodbye. I just bought few strong candies and kept popping them. Its difficult but not impossible. Take it as a challenge and even if you do not succeed at the first time, eventually you will.

  • Nimal De Silva
    June 29, 2016 - 6:25 pm Reply

    I’ve found the best way to quit was to use a vaporiser, commonly misnamed an e-cig… Used a simple starter kit which cost me like $35. Within a month of use, I tried a normal cigarette, and didn’t even like it, threw it away after just 3-4 puffs… I started vaping with 9-6mg of nicotine, within 6mths I was down to just 3mg, Now I don’t even bother to vape as much, and these days I just make my own juice without nicotine. Its like candy for adults… Vaping really worked for me and I’ve spent less than $500 in a year on juice. I can workout, go for my Muay Thai classes and workout with the best of them and I’m not breathless and I quit without having to suffer as much.

    • Gardner
      July 4, 2016 - 10:55 pm Reply


  • Gardner
    July 4, 2016 - 10:54 pm Reply

    I picked up vaping. The by far easiest way. Amazed how easy it was to quit. Before people go off their heads commenting on how we don’t know how safe vaping is and yadda yadda… I realize this. The study’s are only beginning so nobody knows the long term effects. But it’s painfully obvious that vegetable glycerin, propylene glycol, flavourings and nicotine (which is an addictive substance but NOT A CARCINOGEN) is better than arsenic, formaldehyde, benzene, tar etc…etc…etc. I don’t take random articles and papers as always true and I do check the sources, and the fact is that it’s much better than smoking. I realize not puffing anything in any shape or form is best but many people can’t just quit cold turkey; like me. I tried for years and even when I managed to quit for over two months I always got back into the habit thanks to a few cold beers around the fire. Thanks to vaping I have been quit for 3 months without so much as a thought to switch back. Furthermore, my dad who smoked for decades has stopped. I bought him a vape pen and he hasn’t had a problem since. I’m so proud of him and love this vaping scene.

    So nothing you can say can convince me that vaping isn’t the easiest way to kick the butts. Not the best way maybe… But by far the easiest.

  • Tami
    July 5, 2016 - 7:44 pm Reply

    Ladies and Gentlemen… PLEASE listen to this LONG time smoker. I have been smoking since I was 15! I am turning 50 this year. I tried quitting one other time and made it to three months, stress is a big factor for me. QUIT while you can as young as you can, before damage is done. My final quit date is chosen (July 18th) and I will do ALL in my power to not touch another one. I am done with it all.. and I mean ALL of it. I just had my very first bout of COPD and spent a week in the hospital trying like hell to breathe. You do not want this, trust me. If I could do it all over again, I would have never touched these foul things. It was the biggest mistake of my life. But… Here I am, ready to do what I should have done long ago and I WILL stop this from going any further. I have a lot of life to live yet and I am tired of those things controlling MY life. It is time for ME to take control and keep going. I wish you all the best.. Keep up the fight!! One day at a time!

  • yunus
    August 19, 2016 - 9:22 pm Reply

    When I think of quit smoking….!!!!!
    I need a cigarette to think….!!!!!!!

  • Joe Baumgartner
    August 22, 2016 - 5:45 pm Reply

    Hi everyone. I feel that anyone who tries to help others quit smoking and doesn’t mention Alan Carr’s book The Easy Way to Stop Smoking is doing a huge disservice. I realize that many have read the book and still chose to keep smoking, but no one has anything to lose by reading it. I truly believe it is the best way to become mentally prepared to quit smoking. I quit just over a year now and have never been happier.

  • Kelsey
    August 26, 2016 - 9:34 pm Reply

    I just started a 90 exercise program and quit alcohol cold turkey , I use to drink at least 4 bottles a wine and drink everyday or every other day ! It’s been 1 month this coming Tuesday and I am so proud I quit ! Next on my list is smoking . I am 25 and have been smoking 5 years. I buy a pack of smokes every other day. It hasn’t decreased since quitting alcohol because when I want a drink I smoke instead …. A lot! I smoke the most when I drive ! And stressful days at work. Even if I don’t want a smoke I will if I just got into my car about to drive . I’ve been thinking about it for a couple weeks and I think I am ready to quit the nasty habit ! Next is to set a date and cut back and prepare my mind !
    Would love to talk to someone who is also going to quit soon !

    • Caleb
      September 1, 2016 - 6:37 pm Reply

      I am ready to as well. I am was planning sometime this weekend as a cut off date.

  • Caleb
    August 27, 2016 - 12:52 pm Reply

    My revolves around Alan Carr’s book versus one of his online video seminars. They are a lot more expensive and I was wondering if people have viewed them compared to reading his book?

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